Georgia

December 19, 1776

Thomas Paine

In 1776, Georgia patriots, like other Americans during the Revolution, battled not only the British, but demoralization when things went badly…. Or, in the words of Thomas Paine, “the summer soldier and the sunshine Patriot.” Paine, a master at propaganda, had rallied Americans earlier that year with his pamphlet Common Sense, a clarion call for […]

August 2, 1776

Georgia Delegates Sign Declaration of Independence

Georgia joined The United States on August 2, 1776, the same day that Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, and George Walton signed the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia. The declaration was approved on July 4, but signed by only one man that day, John Hancock. Fifty other delegates to the 2nd Continental Congress signed on August […]

August 10, 1774

Sons of Liberty Meet in Savannah

On this day in 1774, revolutionaries were plotting at Tondee’s Tavern in Savannah. Thirty men, calling themselves the “Sons of Liberty,” gathered to plan Georgia’s opposition to British colonial policy. This was Georgia’s first participation in what would become the American Revolution. Nine months earlier a group in Boston protested British policies by throwing 342 […]

June 20, 1770

Moses Waddel

In a half century of teaching, Moses Waddel taught some of the most influential and important statesmen of the 19th century. Born in North Carolina in 1770, he began teaching at age 14. He moved to Georgia briefly but left to attend Hampden Sydney College in Virginia and was ordained as a Presbyterian minister. After […]

March 18, 1766

Stamp Act Repealed

The Stamp Act was supposed to raise money to pay off the country’s enormous debt following eight years of war, but instead it started a revolution. The French and Indian War, fought on the North American frontier, cost Britain a king’s ransom, and Parliament thought the American colonists should help pay for it. The Stamp […]

October 25, 1760

George II

Our state still bears his name, but King George II never set foot here. He was born in Germany and when he succeeded his father, George I, in 1727, he became the second of Britain’s Hanoverian German kings. George II signed the charter creating the colony of Georgia in 1732. James Oglethorpe persuaded the king […]

May 17, 1749

Slavery in Colonial Georgia

At a time when slavery thrived in the American colonies, Georgia, you may be surprised, was alone in banning it. But it wasn’t a moral decision. The Georgia Trustees prohibited slavery because it conflicted with their vision of small landowners prospering from their own labor. They also wanted Georgia to serve as a military buffer […]

June 4, 1738

George III Born

He watched America being born and was its last king. On this day in 1738 at Windsor Castle, Frederick, the Prince of Wales, and his wife Princess Augusta had their first son, George William Frederick. In 1751, the Prince of Wales died. That put 12-year-old George in line for the throne, which he ascended as […]

July 12, 1733

John Percival, Earl of Egmont

Next to James Oglethorpe, he was the most important person in founding the Georgia colony. John Percival was born in County Cork, Ireland, and was educated at Magdalen College at Oxford. He won a seat in the Irish Parliament before he was appointed to the British Privy Council, the sovereign’s private council, a seat he […]

February 12, 1733

Georgia Colony Founded

After years of planning and two months crossing the Atlantic, James Oglethorpe and 114 colonists climbed 40 feet up the bluff from the Savannah River on this day in 1733 and founded the colony of Georgia. George II granted the Georgia trustees a charter for the colony a year earlier. The trustees’ motto was Non […]