Eighteenth century

March 5, 1727

Lachlan McIntosh

He was a Revolutionary leader involved in the most famous duel in Georgia history. Lachlan McIntosh was born in Scotland in 1727 and came to Georgia with a group of Highland Scots to defend the colony’s southern border. He grew up in the Scots settlement of Darien and became a prosperous rice planter. During the […]

March 9, 1736

Charles Wesley

“Hark the Herald Angels Sing,” “Christ the Lord is Risen Today,” “Love Divine, All Loves Excelling” are among the greatest hymns ever written. All are the work of Charles Wesley. He was born in England in 1707 and was educated at Christ Church College at Oxford along with his brother John, where they started the […]

February 14, 1779

Battle of Kettle Creek

Georgians weren’t feeling the love, even if it was Valentine’s Day. The Battle of Kettle Creek was fought during the American Revolution on this day in 1779. 600 loyalists from Georgia and the Carolinas were camped on the creek, which flows into the Little River in Wilkes County, Georgia’s backcountry in those days. The British […]

February 12, 1733

Georgia Colony Founded

After years of planning and two months crossing the Atlantic, James Oglethorpe and 114 colonists climbed 40 feet up the bluff from the Savannah River on this day in 1733 and founded the colony of Georgia. George II granted the Georgia trustees a charter for the colony a year earlier. The trustees’ motto was Non […]

February 10, 1787

William Few

He was the other signer from Georgia of the U.S. Constitution. William Few was born in 1748 in Maryland and moved to Richmond County near Augusta in the 1770s. Few was an active Patriot during the American Revolution. He served in the military, in the state legislature, and as a delegate to the 1777 Georgia […]

January 28, 1791

Mary Telfair

Southern benefactor she was, Southern belle she was not. She nurtured the oldest public art museum in the South. Mary Telfair was born in Augusta on this day in 1791, the daughter of Governor Edward Telfair. She was a child of wealth and privilege, educated in private northern schools. Telfair’s formidable intellect matched her independent […]

January 27, 1785

University of Georgia Chartered

“Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.” So said James Madison, and after the revolution, Georgians realized the fledgling republic would survive only with educated citizens. In 1784, the General Assembly set aside 40,000 acres for a state […]

January 22, 1776

Archibald Bulloch

Theodore Roosevelt’s great-great-grandfather was Georgia’s first chief executive. Archibald Bulloch was born in Charleston in 1730 and moved to Georgia in 1758. When the revolutionary crisis began, Bulloch became an outspoken leader of the Liberty Party that championed American rights. He served as president of Georgia’s Provincial Congress that met in 1775 to address the […]

January 17, 1796

William Washington Gordon

Georgia and its cotton industry may well have gone off the tracks if it hadn’t been for William Washington Gordon. In 1835, Gordon was instrumental in raising money for the railroad that became the Central of Georgia. South Carolina had already built a railroad line from Charleston to the interior. It threatened to send Georgia’s […]

January 12, 1798

James Jackson

James Jackson was a pugnacious politician with a fiery temper. Born in England in 1756, he came to Savannah as a teen and fought in the American Revolution. Jackson served in the first Congress under the new U.S. Constitution, and supported Thomas Jefferson’s fledgling Democratic-Republicans against Alexander Hamilton’s Federalists. Jackson was in the U.S. Senate […]